Posts Tagged ‘Paris’

the berkeley square affair

The Berkeley Square Affair, by Teresa Grant

Today it is my pleasure to welcome as a guest blogger my friend and fellow author Teresa Grant, whose new novel, The Berkeley Square Affair, was released yesterday. Congratulations, Teresa, and welcome to Versailles and More! ====================================== After five years, three books, and two novellas of adventures on the Continent (in Lisbon, Vienna, Brussels during Waterloo, […]



Marie-Antoinette souvenirs at auction

These dainty pink and green silk shoes belonged to Marie-Antoinette. They sold yesterday for 62,460 euros, almost $82,000, at auction in Paris. They are a French size 36 1/2 (6.5 in the US.) According to the auctioneer’s information, they were presented to the Queen by Alexandre-Bernard Ju-Des-Rets, gentleman of her household, at Versailles in 1775. A pink […]



Demolition of the Bastille by Hubert Robert

The Bastille: in the shadow of a fortress

Truth be told, I miss the Bastille. The current column that stands where the old fortress towered above passersby seems very bland by comparison. What a building the old Bastille must have been! But 18th century Parisians had a grimmer take than I on the fortress. It was used as a weapon and ammunition depot […]



Notre Dame de Paris

Eleanor of Aquitaine and My Love Affair with Paris

Another guest post by my friend and fellow historical novelist Christy English, whose new book, TO BE QUEEN: A NOVEL OF THE EARLY LIFE OF ELEANOR OF AQUITAINE, was just released. Heartfelt congratulations to Christy, and best wishes for this new novel of the great Alienor! ================================== I loved Paris before I ever saw it. […]



Luigi-Loir-Paris-snow

Paris under the snow…

This year we did not even wait until December to find Paris and much of Northern France under a thick coat of snow. Traffic is totally gridlocked in and around the capital. This promises us a harsh winter, and a white Christmas! I love this very evocative painting by French artist Luigi Loir (late 19th-early […]



Swimmers-1810-Paris

Swimsuits in 1810 Paris…

Parisians used to love to bathe in the Seine. Horrendous pollution notwithstanding, in the 18th century every summer saw people swimming in the river, generally in the nude. Only at the onset of the French Revolution was skinny-dipping outlawed, for men and women. Hence these early 19th century bathing suits, shown in a print posted […]



rue-saint-nicaise-bomb-attack

CSI: Ile de la Cité, mysteries, thrillers, torture and 1800 forensics

There is no denying that I got lost in Jane Austen’s world during and after the week-end, but this does not mean that I have forgotten For the King. First I would like to call your attention to the review penned by Gerald Everett Jones at Boychik Lit. Every author loves good reviews, and I […]



Paris-Pont-Royal-1850

Discover the Paris of For the King

Alex at Historical Tapestry has a wonderful post on the Paris of For the King. She remarks, and how right she is, that the city is one of the main characters of the novel. So she illustrated various passages with paintings and engravings of the old Paris, and photographs of the modern one. It is […]



Fouche-French-school

The perfect villain: Joseph Fouché, Napoléon’s Minister of Police

All thrillers, and indeed most novels, require a good villain to balance the protagonist and add tension to the plot. Historicals are no exception. When I began writing For the King, which recounts an attempt to assassinate Napoléon Bonaparte in 1800, I imagined that the perpetrators would be the obvious choice. Their crime was heinous […]



henry-iv-assassination-housez

14th of May 1610: assassination of King Henri IV

Henri was known as le bon Roy, the good King. I found memoirs of the Revolution in which he is mentioned, almost 200 years after his death, as “the only king whose memory the people of France have treasured.” When the royal tombs at the Abbey of Saint-Denis were destroyed in 1793, an eyewitness reports […]