Posts Tagged ‘Napoleon’

The Paris Affair, by Teresa Grant

Remember my novel, For The King, where I introduced the rather repulsive (but historically correct) character of Joseph Fouché? Well, fellow author Tracy Grant offers another story featuring Napoléon’s least favorite and most indispensable minister. She kindly agreed to write this guest post for the readers of Versailles and More: The battle of Waterloo may have […]



Imperial wedding: Napoléon and Marie-Louise

First, let us put things in their 1810 context. After his victory at Wagram in 1809, Napoléon is in a position to force Austria to sign a humiliating peace treaty. The French Empire has never been so powerful: it extends all over continental Europe, but the Emperor still has no heir and Joséphine’s day as […]



wedding Napoleon-Marie-Louise-wedding-by-Rouget

Empress Marie-Louise’s wedding gown

I discussed Queen Victoria’s in a prior post. Not that Victoria was the first bride to wear white, far from it, but she was a trend-setter in that regard. White fabrics, since the invention of chlorine bleach by Berthollet in the 1770s, had become affordable and consequently very popular with regular ladies, for both wedding […]



cadenettes

1800 hair fashions: the cadenettes

Some characters in For the King, including the would-be assassin Pierre de Saint-Régent, wear cadenettes. What were they? They consisted in two side braids worn in front of the ears, while the rest of the hair was gathered in two more braids behind the ears. Those were tied on the nape to form a queue. […]



millefeuilles

Millefeuilles and other addictions: Catherine Delors tells all

It is the mark of a skilled interviewer to go beyond the writer’s sunny façade and elicit soul-wrenching confessions. This is exactly what fellow novelist Julianne Douglas does with this interview at Writing the Renaissance. Now you will know (almost) everything about me… And, speaking of millefeuilles, here’s a video that teaches you how to […]



Frances Fanny Burney d Arblay

Women under Napoléon, a conference of the Burney Society in Paris

To be held on June 10 and 11. Our theme will be Women under Napoléon, says the Burney Letter, with keynote talks from Professor Frédéric Ogee of the Université-Paris Diderot and Professor Peter Sabor, from the Burney Centre at McGill University. There will be five Panels looking at Female Journalists and the Revolution; Fashion, Dress, […]



1812 Prianishnikov

A new view of Napoléon’s Russian campaign

Napoléon’s military campaign of 1812 ranks among the worst man-made catastrophes in history. Of his Grande Armée of 600,000 men, only 40,000 returned to France.



Vigee Lebrun Caroline Bonaparte Madame Murat

Painting Caroline Bonaparte’s portrait, by Madame Vigée-Lebrun

Louise-Elisabeth Vigée-Lebrun is best remembered today for being Marie-Antoinette’s favorite portraitist. In fact her career went on for decades, with unabated success, after she left France in October 1789, at the very beginning of the French Revolution. For years Madame Lebrun traveled to Italy, Germany, England and Russia, where she enjoyed the patronage of the […]



Laetitia Ramolino Bonaparte

15th of August 1769: birth of Napoleone di Buonaparte

On that day, Feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin, was born Napoleon Bonaparte, or rather Napoleone di Buonaparte, according to his baptismal certificate, at Ajaccio, in Corsica. The island had become a French territory only a year earlier. The baby was the fourth child and third son of Attorney Carlo Maria di Buonaparte, […]



Carnival in Paris, Marie-Antoinette and the French Revolution

Today is Mardi-Gras, Fat Tuesday, the last day before Lent. Before the French Revolution it was the occasion for bawdy, sometimes lewd masquerades. Raucous parades filed through the streets of Paris, like the promenade du bœuf gras (“fat ox parade.”) A young boy, called “King of the Butchers” with a gilt crown, sword and scepter, […]