Posts Tagged ‘Josephine de Beauharnais’

wedding Napoleon-Marie-Louise-wedding-by-Rouget

Empress Marie-Louise’s wedding gown

I discussed Queen Victoria’s in a prior post. Not that Victoria was the first bride to wear white, far from it, but she was a trend-setter in that regard. White fabrics, since the invention of chlorine bleach by Berthollet in the 1770s, had become affordable and consequently very popular with regular ladies, for both wedding […]



Josephine de Beauharnais Bonaparte Prudhon

Joséphine and Bonaparte: a romance

Every marriage is complex, this one more than most. At first glance, the 26 year old General, with his angular face and brusque manners, and the graceful queen of the brilliant but corrupt demi-monde of the late Revolution seem to form an odd couple. Dominique de Villepin, in Le soleil noir de la puissance, notes […]



Doomed Queens Kris Waldherr

An interview of Kris Waldherr, author of Doomed Queens

Doomed Queens: Royal Women Who Met Bad Ends, From Cleopatra to Princess Di, is Kris Waldherr’s new book. Lavishly illustrated by the author herself, it contains brief biographies (two or three pages per Queen) from all eras and continents. While the format precludes any in-depth study of any of the characters reviewed, I found the compilation […]



Hydrangea Redoute

Hydrangeas, Queen Hortense, the Hortensia Diamond

My thanks go to Felio, a reader of this blog, who is a florist by trade and gave me the idea of flower-themed posts. The first that came to mind were hydrangeas, because my paternal grandmother, gardener extraordinaire, used to grow them in the mountains of Auvergne. Needless to say, they are not hardy enough […]



Calliope Collection of Josephine

Joséphine’s antiques

I had missed the exhibition titled De Pompéi à Malmaison, les antiques de Joséphine, at Malmaison and only discovered its existence today thanks to a poster in the metro! Joséphine Bonaparte purchased the Château of Malmaison, a few miles west of Paris, in 1799, only months before her husband seized power and became First Consul. […]



David Bonaparte crossing the Alps

My second novel: For The King

I am often asked whether it is a sequel to Mistress of the Revolution. The answer is no. The characters of my first novel had such a grip of my mind that I needed to establish some distance, at least for a while. But my readers will recognize the same setting, the familiar streets of […]