Page 1 of 3 -123

Archive for the ‘Napoléon & Joséphine’ Category

wedding napoleon marie-louise religious ceremony

Imperial wedding: Napoléon and Marie-Louise

First, let us put things in their 1810 context. After his victory at Wagram in 1809, Napoléon is in a position to force Austria to sign a humiliating peace treaty. The French Empire has never been so powerful: it extends all over continental Europe, but the Emperor still has no heir and Joséphine’s day as […]

Print Friendly
Share/Bookmark



wedding Napoleon-Marie-Louise-wedding-by-Rouget

Empress Marie-Louise’s wedding gown

I discussed Queen Victoria’s in a prior post. Not that Victoria was the first bride to wear white, far from it, but she was a trend-setter in that regard. White fabrics, since the invention of chlorine bleach by Berthollet in the 1770s, had become affordable and consequently very popular with regular ladies, for both wedding […]

Print Friendly



Pierre-de-Saint-regent

For the King: the Christmas Eve assassins

Today is the 210th anniversary of the Rue Nicaise attack, the topic of my second novel, For the King. The assassination attempt against Napoleon Bonaparte missed its target, but killed or maimed dozens of innocents.Today is the 210th anniversary of the 1800 Rue Nicaise bombing, which is the backdrop of my second novel, For the […]

Print Friendly



Tower-of-the-Temple-1795-cropped

The Temple: Napoléon’s political jail

For the King relates the circumstances of the Rue Nicaise conspiracy, a failed attempt to assassinate Napoléon Bonaparte on Christmas Eve 1800. Indeed Napoléon had a surfeit of political enemies. They fell into two opposite camps: the Chouans were Royalists and wanted to restore King Louis XVIII to the throne, while the Jacobins yearned to […]

Print Friendly



cadenettes

1800 hair fashions: the cadenettes

Some characters in For the King, including the would-be assassin Pierre de Saint-Régent, wear cadenettes. What were they? They consisted in two side braids worn in front of the ears, while the rest of the hair was gathered in two more braids behind the ears. Those were tied on the nape to form a queue. […]

Print Friendly



Jean-Cottereau-known-as-Jean-Chouan

The Chouans, Jean Chouan, the Catholic and Royal Army and the fall of Napoléon

On Christmas Eve 1800, a group of Chouans, royalist insurgents, detonated a bomb along Napoléon Bonaparte’s path. This assassination attempt provides the backdrop of my new novel, For the King. Readers have asked me for more information about them. Why the name Chouans? What drove them to political violence? Were they a major political force? […]

Print Friendly



Louis_XVIII_private_collection

Louis XVIII and Napoléon: the King and the Emperor

In 1800 Louis XVIII was 45. He had been friendly to reform in the beginnings of the French Revolution. But as it took a more radical turn, he had fled at the same time as the royal couple. Only he had succeeded in reaching Brussels when Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette were arrested near the border. […]

Print Friendly



Josephine-bonaparte-by-Isabey

Napoléon and Joséphine in 1800

An interesting couple if ever there was one… Bonaparte then is not the portly man we have come to associate with traditional Napoleonic imagery. He has not yet crowned himself Emperor of the French, but he has seized power a year earlier in a bloodless coup. In 1800 he is the First Consul, a reference […]

Print Friendly



Fouche-French-school

The perfect villain: Joseph Fouché, Napoléon’s Minister of Police

All thrillers, and indeed most novels, require a good villain to balance the protagonist and add tension to the plot. Historicals are no exception. When I began writing For the King, which recounts an attempt to assassinate Napoléon Bonaparte in 1800, I imagined that the perpetrators would be the obvious choice. Their crime was heinous […]

Print Friendly



Theodore Gericault The Wounded Cuirassier

Photographs of Napoléon’s soldiers

Yes, you read this correctly: photographs. Of course, photography did not exist in Napoléon’s time. Louis Daguerre and Nicéphore Niepce would not produce their first daguerreotypes until 1835, twenty years after the fall of the First French Empire, and the process would not become wildly popular until the 1840s. Only then did these soldiers, already […]

Print Friendly



Page 1 of 3 -123